Evidence

Impacts of music in early years

The London Early Years Music Network has published an evidence review exploring the impacts of music on young children’s physical, mental and psychological development.

Cultural participation helps maintain health literacy

New research from University College London demonstrates that internet use and social engagement, particularly in cultural activities (eg, attending the cinema, art galleries, museums and the theatre), may help older adults to maintain health literacy during ageing.

Transforming Education Through the Arts

New Australian research shows that learning an instrument by 12 years of age can advance children’s literacy skills by up to a year compared to those who do not learn music.

Meanings of wellbeing

‘The Wellbeing of Nations: Meaning, Motive and Measurement’ is a new publication exploring the challenges in assessing social wellbeing.

New Impact Measurement Tools

Two new impact measurement tools have been launched to help charities to measure their impact on participants and the wider community.

Cultural Value and Social Capital

The work of arts and cultural organisations is life-enhancing and delivers positive effects on people’s health and wellbeing and on the strength of their communities, a new report reveals.

Understanding the value and impacts of cultural experiences

Arts Council England have published Understanding the value and impacts of cultural experiences, an international literature review conducted for them by WolfBrown.

Qualitative research into the impact of the arts on health

Australian researchers have published a new piece of qualitative research into the links between the arts and health. The detailed research, while limited in scope, concluded that the arts have the potential to assist in the promotion of health and healing.

Link between choirs and wellbeing

Researchers at Oxford Brookes University have found a link between choral participation and positive psychological wellbeing. An online study asked 375 people who sang in choirs, sang alone or were members of sports teams about their experience of these activities.

Music lessons and brain development

Researchers in Beijing have discovered a connection between music tuition and brain development. The research involved brain scans and noted that the brains of children who were taking music lessons developed cognitive function more rapidly than a control group.

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