Latest resources

In this section you will find all the research, guidelines, data and resources that we have included in the LAHF newsletter. You can filter these by type of resource, or by theme using the tags on the right hand side of this page.

For more comprehensive collections of research and resources visit Links.

Salisbury Hospital arts review

The University of Winchester has published a research-based evaluation of the impact of Salisbury Hospital’s arts programme on its participants: the patients (with a main focus on older people), the hospital staff and the artists.

Winston Churchill reports

Among the reports recently published by fellows on the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust website include several exploring the role of the arts in supporting older people’s care.

Fellows whose travel and research covered older people’s care include Filipa Pereira Stubbs and Olwen Minford.

Research on comics and health

Researcher Sarah McNichol has published research into the impact of comics in supporting people with health conditions.

The research used interviews with people with health conditions to see how educational comics could be evaluated to ensure that their impact on patients’/relatives’ feelings and attitudes is considered, in addition to factual recall.

Research links creative jobs to wellbeing

A new report by charity NESTA has found people in creative occupations report higher levels of subjective wellbeing.

Refreshed guidance on artists’ pay

a-n The Artists Information Company has published research into the context of its guidance on pay levels for freelance artists.

The research demonstrates the rates for artists pay recommendations and sets the recommended levels for UK artists in an international context, supporting the argument for the pay levels the organisation recommends.

Heritage link to quality of life

New research indicates a strong link between heritage activities and individual and community wellbeing.

Conducted by Britain Thinks on behalf of the Heritage Lottery Fund, the research found that:

How Music Helps

A new book by Gary Ansdell, Director of Education for Nordoff Robbins explores the ways music can help people in their everyday lives and as a tool for music therapy.

Arts and Aging

A systematic review of the impact of community based arts interventions on cognition in people with dementia has been published in the journal of Aging and Mental Health.

Study into music’s impacts

A new study draws together different strands of research into the impacts of music making on the development of children and young people.

The research, by Professor Susan Hallam, explores intellectual, social and personal development and the ways involvement in music making can support and influence growth and development.

Pop for health education

A new paper on health and social marketing explores the potential for pop music to be harnessed as a health education tool.

The paper is one of a range of resources at http://www.sexanddrugsandrockandhealth.com/

Cultural participation helps maintain health literacy

New research from University College London demonstrates that internet use and social engagement, particularly in cultural activities (eg, attending the cinema, art galleries, museums and the theatre), may help older adults to maintain health literacy during ageing.

Transforming Education Through the Arts

New Australian research shows that learning an instrument by 12 years of age can advance children’s literacy skills by up to a year compared to those who do not learn music.

Be Reflective

West Midlands Arts Health and Wellbeing has produced a tool aimed at helping experienced artists to develop strategies for achieving quality in arts and health projects.

Guidelines for arts and mental health projects

Country Arts in Australia has produced a set of guidelines to help arts and mental health workers looking to delivery creative activities.

Creating Health Collaborative

A group of leading health researchers and academics have joined together to produce a new report exploring potential ways in which healthcare provision could be developed.

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