Creative ageing sector flourishing but further action needed

Creative ageing activity has expanded significantly over the last decade, but there is a real need to ensure that more marginalised older people have opportunities to be creative, according to a new King’s College London report.

Commissioned by the Baring Foundation and researched by Dr Rebecca Gordon-Nesbitt, Older and Wiser? Creative ageing 2010-2019 reviews the development of the creative ageing sector over the past decade, examining how far it has come and considering where it should go next.

The review reveals a flourishing sector, with the establishment of high-quality programmes all the country over the past decade. Training for artists and care workers has received a boost, and there are now excellent resources to inspire and guide practitioners, as well as spaces to meet and share ideas. The idea of ageing creatively has become more widely accepted among arts organisations, care organisations, funders and the general public.

However, Gordon-Nesbitt says there is more to be done to ‘normalise the role of the arts in the lives of older people’. This will require a concerted effort – on the part of funders, politicians, policymakers and national arts bodies – to sustain and develop the excellent work now happening. The report underlines the particular need for the sector to reach out to older people who are not already engaged with the arts and to extend its reach further in terms of gender, class, ethnicity and sexuality.

The report can be read in full here. [LINK] https://baringfoundation.org.uk/resource/older-and-wiser-creative-ageing-in-the-uk-2010-19/