Research

Assessment of the impact of arts on learning

The Cultural Learning Alliance has published key findings demonstrating the impact of the arts on the social and educational achievements of children and young people. Amongst the findings, based on a review of all available large-scale English language data including from the US, are:

How Audiences and Visitors are Transformed by Cultural Experiences in Liverpool

This report discusses the range of findings with respect to audiences’ ‘readiness to receive’ the art and the six constructs of intrinsic impact.

In this collaborative pilot study, eight arts and cultural organisations in Liverpool (acting together as the Liverpool Arts Regeneration Consortium, or LARC) surveyed audiences and visitors about the impacts of their experiences over the 2009-10.

w: www.larc.uk.com/2011/06/innovative-intrinsic-impacts-study-released/
 

ISAN national evaluation of outdoor arts audiences project

ISAN is commissioning the Centre for Research on Socio-cultural Change at the University of Manchester, under the direction of Senior Research Fellow Dr Andrew Miles, to conduct a national evaluation of outdoor arts events over a three year period and is seeking festival and carnival partners interested in being part of the project.

The Relationship between Quilting and Wellbeing

Researchers from the University of Glasgow have published their findings about the relationship between creative craft hobbies and wellbeing in the general population.

The findings illustrate how creative craft hobbies such as quilting can be a meaningful vehicle for enhancing wellbeing and sets the foundation for further research into creativity, creative hobbies and hobbies in general.

Norwegian study discovers evidence that culture may improve health

The aim of this study was to analyse the association between cultural activity and perceived health, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life in both genders. The study is based on the third population-based Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (2006–2008), including 50,797 adult participants from Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway. Data on cultural activities, both receptive and creative, perceived health, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life were collected by questionnaires.

Norwegian study discovers evidence that culture may improve health

The aim of this study was to analyse the association between cultural activity and perceived health, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life in both genders.

“Whose Cake is it Anyway?” Paul Hamlyn Foundation

In 2009, Paul Hamlyn Foundation commissioned Dr. Bernadette Lynch to work with a study group of 12 museums and their community partners across the UK, to gauge the real nature and effectiveness of the engagement practices of museums and galleries. Lynch recommends that participation must be embedded at the core of an organisation, rather than being run as a series of short-term, stand-alone projects.

Changing face of artists' employment

A new report from A-N, the Artists’ Information Company explores the effect of the economic recession on the livelihoods of artists in terms of access to employment and career opportunities and raises concerns about how artists' practice is likely to fare in this period of arts austerity.

Key findings:

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